Mountain Lion Attacks Boy in Colorado

The past week has definitely seen a rush of predator attacks on people. We first heard of the Black Bear in Tennessee killing a six year old girl, now we have news of a mountain lion stalking and attacking a seven year old boy in Colorado. The boy was apparently the last in a single-file line of seven other people taking a short hike Saturday at a scenic area of Flagstaff Mountain. Fortunately the the rest of the party aggressively defended the boy against the cougar and chased it off with rocks and sticks before it became fatal. The boy suffered scratches and puncture wounds, but should be alright. Wildlife officials tracked the mountain lion down and ended up killing it.

Here is the full story from the Colorado Fish and Game:

YOUNG BOY ATTACKED BY A MOUNTAIN LION WEST OF BOULDER

A seven-year-old boy was attacked by a mountain lion at approximately 6 p.m. on Saturday at Artist’s Point on Flagstaff Mountain, just west of the Boulder city limits.

The boy was walking hand in hand with his father at the end of a group of six other family members and friends. The attack took place on a trail 30 yards away from the parking lot to the popular scenic overlook. The lion bit the boy in the head and jaw area and also injured the boy’s legs, most likely with its hind paws. The family took the correct action in this very rare type of incident by aggressively fighting the lion with sticks and rocks in an effort to get the lion to release the boy. The boy was taken to the Boulder County Hospital and later transferred to Denver Children’s hospital. The injuries to the child are not considered life threatening.

The DOW officers on scene worked with a houndsman to track the lion with trained dogs. The lion was treed approximately a half mile away from the location where the attack took place. The lion was killed by a DOW officer just after midnight. Due to the proximity of the location of the attack and mountain lion behavior, the DOW officers are confident that this was the lion involved in the attack.

“When an attack such as this occurs, the DOW makes every effort to remove the animal involved,” said Tyler Baskfield, public information specialist with the DOW. “This type of incident is extremely rare, even in this particular area which is considered prime mountain lion habitat and very popular with outdoor recreationists. While such a removal is a very unpleasant task for wildlife officials, due to this lion’s behavior it was killed to prevent anyone else from being injured.”

The female lion will undergo a necropsy later this week to determine if there was any type of injury or disease that would have contributed to its aggressive behavior.

Several nearby residents were alerted to the situation by DOW personnel shortly after the attack. The area was also closed to recreation until after the lion was killed.

There are approximately 5,000 mountain lions in Colorado. There have been two confirmed fatal attacks on humans recorded in the state in the past two decades.

The DOW recommends people take a few simple precautions when in mountain lion habitat in an effort to keep both people and wildlife safe.

* When venturing into mountain lion habitat, go in groups and make plenty of noise in an effort to reduce your chances of surprising a lion. Make sure children are close to and under the supervision of adults. Teach children about mountain lions and what to do if they see one.

Do not approach lions. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give the lion a way to escape.

* Stay calm if you come upon a lion. Talk to it in a firm voice in an effort to demonstrate that you are human and not its regular prey.

* Back away slowly. Running may stimulate a lion’s instinct to chase and attack.

* Face the lion and make an effort to appear as large as possible. Open your jacket or lift objects to appear like a more formidable opponent. Pick up your children.

* If the lion behaves aggressively, throw rocks, sticks or whatever you can pick up, with out turning your back to the lion or bending down.

* If the lion would happen to attack, fight back. Lions have been driven away by prey that fights back. Remain standing and keep attempting to get back up if you are brought to the ground.

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11 Comments on "Mountain Lion Attacks Boy in Colorado"

  1. LARRY ROYBAL says:

    SORRY TO HEAR ABOUT IT

  2. Burrito Man says:

    Thats Garys dad^

  3. Shannon Parke says:

    My name is Shannon Parker and I was attacked by a mountain lion June 26, 2004. I was hiking with three boys at the Johnsondale Bride/Lake Isabella, California. I know first hand what it is like to be attacked by a mountain lion, that little boy is extremely lucky as am I. Please contact me if you would like to do a story. Thank you

    Shannon Parker

  4. Angelica says:

    I`m a student of english in Peru and I read your story in the reader`s digest , sincerely I admire you to much. You have to continue to help others in need. Good luck. Angie

  5. Peter Kullavanijaya says:

    The Take Away Lesson:

    When you go into the forest, woods, or any remote areas you should have proper gear. A critical gear is a suitable and well powered firearms, e.g., high powered rifles, shotguns, or souped up with hot loads handguns. Remember, when it comes to carnivour encounters, the heavier the bullets the better. What ever caliber you launch from your weapons should be the heaviest bullets that you can handle, and your pocket book can take. Just remember that heavy bullets stop nasty critters in their tracks, i.e., bear, mountain lion, mule deer, moose, including Mr. and Mrs. Bigfoot, if it comes to that.

  6. Rachael says:

    What would you do if you were attacked by a mountain lion and there was only one person with you and no cell service. What procedures could you do to try to keep the person alive if bit or scratched severly.

  7. ramon bisque says:

    See my summary of experiences with cougars just south of Boulder in the Coal creek Canyon area.

    “Lions of the Lyons” Colorado Cougars in a Modern Predator/Prey Drama.

  8. Loretta Bowman says:

    Thank you wildlife officials to taking this lion out. I know it is a hard thing for you to do and noone wants an animal killed unnecessarily. Mountain lions are beautiful creatures – but they are serious predators and people need to realize how dangerous hey are – not “Bambi”. Those truly educated about mountain lions know how serious they are. Conversely, we are more and more impeding upon their habitat. Therefore I say, especially in mountain lion country, please leave your children at home. Reserve their nature hikes for areas that are not in mountain lion country. Lions will steel them out of your very hands. If your not comfortable with guns – as an earlier write recommended – AT LEAST take a good knife and pepper spray.

  9. shane barbour says:

    thats why hounds need to be brought back in all states!!!!!!!!!

  10. Brenda Worrell says:

    I was attacked by a mountain lion, as well. It was 15 years ago and I still have nightmares about it. Feel free to contact me if you want details, as well.

  11. Randy says:

    Would love to hear your story Brenda. Feel free to e-mail me telling me about it. Where did your attack occur ? Some of my family venture out into the state parks & recreation areas here in CA. They mentioned to me the signs warning of cougar country … although they didn’t think too much about it … I told them to take it seriously.

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